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LPLE

LPLE is a podcast dedicated to helping people who are learning English practice their English listening skill. Jesse and Andrew, LPLE show hosts and native English speakers, have a regular native English conversation, and speak slowly and clearly so that the listeners can better understand the conversation.
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Now displaying: June, 2016
Jun 21, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew reflect on their travels to Japan, and Jesse talks about his favorite thing to do when he's in Japan. 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: Before we begin, I'd like to say a special hello to students from two different schools now who are listening to LPLE to improve their English listening skills. Students from EKO English Pronunciation in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, and I also found out that we have some students from our local City University who are also using LPLE for their school assignments and, just in general, to improve their English listening comprehension. So, hello!

Andrew: That's great news! Welcome, folks!

Jesse: Andrew, one thing you and I have in common is we have both been to Japan.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: When did you go?

Andrew: It's been a while; I went back in 2008.

Jesse: So, that's about...

Andrew: Eight years ago?

Jesse: Yeah, that's right. A lot has changed since.

Andrew: I'm not surprised.

Jesse: The last time I was in Japan was last fall, and before that it had also been about eight years. Let me tell you, I love Japan. I think you feel the same way. 

Andrew: I really enjoyed my trip.

Jesse: There's a few things I really enjoy about Japan. Every time I go, I always have a wonderful time, and it's primarily because, one, I have friends there, and they always take really good care of me. In general, not just because I have friends, but Japanese people, in general, are very welcoming. Did you experience that yourself?

Andrew: That's very much what I experienced when I went there. Even just from people on the street, or the people you met in stores or on the train, they were all very kind and very accommodating, and I was going without any Japanese language experience--I was speaking only English--and they were very accommodating of my need to work in my own language and learn my way around the city and find out what I needed to do.

Jesse: So, very similar to my experience in Vietnam, because I can speak Japanese, I found that social barriers and any level of potential discomfort in interacting with a foreigner is immediately removed.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: It also makes it much easier for me to establish--to create--my own social network in Japan. That's why every time I go back to Japan, I always let my friends know in advance and then I start to schedule time with them to go have dinner, to go have drinks, and, more importantly--I would say probably most importantly--I make sure to schedule time to go to karaoke.

Andrew: Hahaha! That's the only reason you're going to Japan, isn't it, Jesse?...

Jesse: Let me tell you, if I ever lived in Japan, I sincerely believe that I would be going to karaoke probably every day, if not every other day. I love it that much when I'm in Japan. You know what's funny? I live here in Seattle, and we have plenty of karaoke places. There's actual places that are just for karaoke and then there are bars, and in bars, there are karaoke machines, and you stand up on a stage in front of people, and you sing. When I'm in Seattle, my desire to go to karaoke is pretty small; I don't think about it that much. When I'm in Japan, that's almost all I can think about--is "when am I going to be going to my next karaoke party?"

Andrew: Okay, so what is different about going to do karaoke in Japan that makes you so excited about it?

Jesse: Well, in Japan the entire system is different when it comes to karaoke. Again, in America, it's very common to stand up on a stage in front of strangers and sing.

Andrew: So you have to put on a performance for people you don't know.

Jesse: That's right. So, it feels very intimidating, especially for people who are new. However, in Japan, it's very different. All karaoke places have separate rooms that you rent, and the rooms vary on size: Some rooms are very small for only four people--actually maybe even smaller I hear, sometimes for only two people; very small--and they can be as large as enough to fit 10 people or 15 people; an actual big party. So, you're in a room with just your friends, so the level of intimidation and fear to sing in front of people is a lot lower, and even in those rooms, because you feel more comfortable then you can let yourself have a lot of fun, specifically in this particular room I went to last time they had a mini stage with a microphone stand, and you felt like you were giving a performance, but you were giving a performance to all of your friends who are cheering you on.

Now, not only do I speak Japanese but I also can sing in Japanese I will not touch you with my singing in Japanese right now you will have to come because I sing in Japanese and his friends and I'm a foreigner who can speak Japanese in Japanese and that much more amusing to watch them no. And it's a positive feedback loop because I'm having fun and my friends are having fun and then cheering me on which makes me have that much more fun when I'm singing for them overall look I love Japan I love going to Japan I love speaking Japanese I love Japanese food I love Japanese culture music everything but if there's one thing I love the most about going to Japan it's going to karaoke.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 14, 2016

Jesse and Andrew talk about and analyze what President Obama's visit to Vietnam could mean for the United States and Vietnam's economic growth, including US allowing Vietnam to purchase weapons from the US, and VietJet Air's purchase of 100 Boeing airplanes.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: This has been an interesting week for our president, right? He is currently in Asia, East and Southeast Asia. Most recently, he's visited Vietnam.

Now, this makes me very excited for many, many reasons. Number one, I studied Vietnamese for three years and can speak it pretty well. Two, I actually lived in Vietnam for a total of one year: three months in Hanoi and about nine to ten months in Ho Chi Minh City. And, furthermore, this makes me excited because the nature of his trip went a bit beyond standard meet-and-greet diplomacy.

Andrew: Definitely.

Jesse: If I'm not mistaken there were some economic opportunities that he was trying to stimulate by going to Vietnam. Now, Vietnam recently had an election, so they have undergone some new political changes themselves. So, a new government is coming in, while in America our president is leaving. But, nevertheless, this created a really unique opportunity for the two countries to really think about the economic partnership that they can create.

Andrew: Definitely. They took this opportunity in a big way. The United States ended its embargo of selling arms to Vietnam, while the president was there. And, what that means is... Well, first, as background, for a long time since the end of the conflict in Vietnam where America was fighting a war there, the United States has made it forbidden for any American companies to sell weapons like guns or military aircraft to Vietnam; and, that embargo was lifted, meaning that companies like Boeing and Airbus and others can now sell their products in Vietnam for the first time.

Jesse: That is a huge deal. That's probably the first of many large economic opportunities that came from this trip. We could spend this entire episode just focused on that economic opportunity alone, about America lifting its arms embargo off of Vietnam, that America can now sell weapons to the Vietnamese government. It's worth remembering that America sells billions of dollars worth of arms to other countries. We are good at this; we as a country are good at manufacturing weapons and selling them to other countries. So, it sounds like Vietnam is going to be our newest customer. Now, the second thing that immediately came from this opportunity, from this visit was that VietJet Air placed an order for 100 Boeing airplanes. Now, of course VietJet Air and Boeing we're probably working on this contract well before the president came to Vietnam.

Andrew: Definitely.

Jesse: But, it sounds like they knew the president was coming, and so they decided to hold off on signing the contract until he got there so that the president could include that in his remarks about the economic opportunity between the two countries.

Andrew: It is a good symbol of the kind of commerce and economic cooperation between the countries that can happen in the years to come.

Jesse: Before now VietJet Air only purchased airplanes from Airbus. Airbus is a European company. Now, with this purchase of 100 airplanes from Boeing, that introduces economic opportunity for us. Here in the Northwest, in our city, Boeing is here. Boeing has offices here, but they also have manufacturing plants here. So their purchase a 100 planes is going to mean good things for our local economy.

Andrew: That's right. The factories that build the 737 they are going to sell are right here in town, which means that your company in Seattle is going to be selling airplanes to the cities you love in Vietnam.

Jesse: So as I think about Vietnam economic future, I foresee a lot more companies paying more attention to Vietnam, especially now after President Obama went to Vietnam. And that's great, because it sounds like Vietnam is a growing market.

When I lived there, it was extremely obvious that the education system is progressing very fast and there are a lot of educated, English-speaking, local Vietnamese there. I see in the future a lot of jobs being created in Vietnam, which also means that local companies here might be outsourcing some other work to Vietnam where the skill of labor might be equal but the wages are a lot lower in Vietnam.

Andrew: Right. It means a lot of opportunities for good paying jobs for Vietnamese working for American companies in the future as part of this economic cooperation.

Jesse: This kind of diplomatic exchange is very common. We know this. One of the big things that was happening that I think we in America did not hear much about was similar diplomatic relationships being created between a few countries in Africa and China.

Andrew: Yes. China is investing very heavily in Africa in the same way that America is investing in parts of Asia to build those connections and create those opportunities both for Chinese products being sold and used in Africa, but also for resources and jobs being developed in Africa for China.

Jesse: There are mutually beneficial reasons why countries engage in these kinds of diplomatic relationships. Sometimes country A has resources that country B wants, and sometimes country B creates many products that country A wants. And, so what they're doing is they're negotiating to make it easier for those two countries to get those goods and services and natural resources to each other in a way that is equitable, mutually beneficial, and looks good politically. Because, at the end of the day, politicians want to do things that are going to keep them in power, that are going to keep them in their offices, so of course it makes sense that they're going to do things that are going to help their people, so long as they remind their people that, "hey it was our party that helped increase your economic opportunity."

Andrew: I can't wait to see how much Vietnam has changed as a result of this new economic opportunity the next time we go back.

Jesse: That's right. We should plan another trip!

Andrew: And soon!

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 4, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse talks about taking his wife to Vancouver BC, Canada for the Night Market. Andrew gives Jesse recommendations on two good restaurants: Japadog and Banana Leaf. 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world. 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: My wife and I are going to be taking a weekend vacation to Canada...

Andrew: Excellent.

Jesse: We call it a "weekend getaway." Now, this is because it was her birthday this week, and we were thinking about how we can celebrate. We also recognize that we haven't been to Canada in a while. We live in Seattle, so if we get in our car and drive, it really only takes us--assuming no traffic...

Andrew: ...About two to two-and-a-half hours.

Jesse: That's right. So, one of the things that my wife and I like to do when we travel is eat good food, and, as I understand it, in Canada--in Vancouver and in Richmond--there are all sorts of places for good food.

Andrew: That is totally right. Vancouver is actually very well known for its food in large part because there are a lot of different cultures and communities living within different parts of Vancouver; and, that means that you can get different styles of food from all different parts of the world in a very small space and try all kinds of things that you might not have access to if you are in a different city that doesn't have as many options.

As you said, Vancouver is very close to Seattle and the United States, so it shares a lot of cultures and customs and it is easy to travel to, but that also means that it has a lot of the same common foods that you would find here. You can get good hamburgers, you can get good steak, you can get a lot of traditional American dishes, but you also can get a lot of the ethnic dishes that you might not be able to find elsewhere. There is a very, very large Asian population in Vancouver and specifically in the suburb of Richmond, which is just to the south of the city, and that means that you can find all kinds of Vietnamese neighborhoods, and Chinese neighborhoods, and Japanese neighborhoods, and Thai neighborhoods, and almost every single kind of food you might find in Asia and Southeast Asia, in large parts of Africa, most of Europe, all of it is available in one place, and that makes for a really great food tourism trip.

Jesse: During this 3-day, 2-night weekend getaway, we've rented a house in Richmond. Now, luckily Richmond and Vancouver are right next to each other, right?

Andrew: Very close.

Jesse: We're going up to Richmond primarily for this thing called a "Night Market." This happens every year during the late-spring to mid-summer, I believe...

Andrew: Usually during the fair-weather months--the part of the year where it's not going to be too rainy, it's going to stay light longer, and it's easier to have a nightly event.

Jesse: Right. This is outdoors.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: So, it stands to reason that they want to have this night market during the times when the weather is going to be very nice. At this night market, there are lots of great Taiwanese, Mainland Chinese, and Hong Kong foods. So, we've rented a place nearby the night market, but we're also going to spend a lot of time in Vancouver. Now, before we get into what we're going to eat or where we should go, as I understand it, the exchange rate is pretty favorable for us.

Andrew: For Americans.

Jesse: For Americans.

Andrew: The Canadian dollar is not worth the same amount as the American dollar, even though we are living right next to each other. And, it actually moves, so relative to the American dollar, the Canadian Dollar might be worth more or less. And, a few years ago we were actually at parity, which means that the Canadian dollar is equal to the American dollar, so you could use one or the other and they were worth the same.

In each country, the prices don't change very much year over year. So, if you are making money in Canada and spending money in Canada, you don't notice this exchange rate. But, many people living in Vancouver might come to the United States to shop and vice-versa--Americans going to Canada to shop--depending on what that exchange rate is like. And, right now, fortunately for American tourists going to Canada, the Canadian dollar is cheap, which means they can use the same number of American dollars and buy more things in Canada.

Jesse: Now, you go up to Vancouver a lot--multiple times in one year.

Andrew: Yes. I have friends up there, so I have a place to go to stay, and I get to visit with my friends, and get to enjoy the good food, besides.

Jesse: So, not just for me, but also for the listening audience, if they go up to Vancouver, what are the, let's say, one or two, maybe at most three places that you would absolutely recommend that we go.

Andrew: So, one of the popular food cart style places that got its start in Vancouver--and Canada in general--that is worth going to see is called Japadog. And, this is a hot dog food cart that serves Japanese-style hot dogs, which means that instead of the more traditional toppings like onions, and mustard, and ketchup, there are a lot of different varieties of Japanese-inspired flavors that they put on these hot dogs. So, you can get different varieties of sauces like fish sauce, plum sauce, some tempura vegetables, and a lot of the same types of ingredients that might go into a teriyaki or sushi dish, mixed up with the hot dog, and it makes for a very interesting flavor. And, you can try different varieties between you and your wife, or you and your friends when you go.

My favorite place, though, is a more formal restaurant--not fancy just a place to go in, and sit down, and have a meal--and it serves Malaysian and Singaporean style food. That place is called Banana Leaf, and there are multiple locations around Vancouver, so it's easy to find one that is nearby. They make very, very good family style meals that you can put together. And, the set meal that I try to get when I go up is a combination of Rendang, which is Malaysian or Indonesian beef stew, and that comes as a side, I get Roti, which is the fried bread, up front with butter and peanut sauce to snack on. They bring coconut rice wrapped up in a steamed banana leaf to go with the Rendang, and they also have a white fish in black oyster sauce, I believe, that is cooked up beautifully. Oh, and, finally, as a vegetable side, they make Sambal Green Beans, which are crunchy, fried green beans in shrimp paste. And, for some reason, those combinations of flavors together in one meal are just about the best meal that I can find up there. And, I can't get it in Seattle, so I look forward to it every time I go up.

Jesse: That sounds fantastic. Andrew, if I could, I would buy that and bring it down for you when I come back to Seattle. But, I don't think I can.

Andrew: Sadly, I don't think there's going to be any left when you're done.

Jesse: One of the things I really enjoy eating when I'm in Vancouver is Chinese food, specifically soup dumplings. Soup dumplings are very popular here in Seattle. We have Din Tai Fung--now has two or three restaurants in the-... in the area. In Vancouver, there are many other places to get soup dumplings, and every time we go up, we always go to a small hole-in-the-wall restaurant. We usually have to wait in line for an hour because, again, it's a small restaurant...

Andrew: And it's so popular.

Jesse: ...And it is so popular, and we always order soup dumplings, and we always leave very satisfied. This is going to be a vacation; this is going to be three days of us gaining weight.

Andrew: Hahaha. I wouldn't have it any other way. I hope you have a good trip.

Jesse: Thank you.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 3, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about female heroes in action movies and television, and compare what they liked and disliked with the Black Widow character in the recent Avengers movie with the female heroes in Game of Thrones.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world. 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hi, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: Over the past couple of weeks, you and I have been watching a lot of TV and a few movies.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: One of the conversations we had about TV and movies is the role of the women characters.

Andrew: Ahhh, yes.

Jesse: Now, you and I have had some pretty impassioned discussions about this; very passionate conversations. We have our opinions about what makes an ideal heroine character.

Andrew: Right. You mean-... I think you and I have been trying to find a way to agree on what makes for a powerful female lead character in a story and in a TV show, the heroin, the woman who is the main character and the one we are rooting for to succeed.

Jesse: The female hero.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: A lot of the shows and movies we have been watching have been from the Marvel Universe. So, for listeners who may be unfamiliar with this, Marvel is a comic book company they are the company who has created The Avengers, The X-Men...what else?

Andrew: Characters like Captain America, and Ironman, and Hulk, and Thor, and Spiderman.

Jesse: Right. And then, we've also been watching a few other individual shows outside of that particular company. So, one show that comes to mind is Game of Thrones, a very popular show. And, you've also been watching Orphan Black.

Andrew: That's right.

Jesse: And, if I'm not mistaken, the main character in that show is a female.

Andrews: Main characters, in fact.

Jesse: Main characters. One of the things I mentioned to you was my disappointment in how the female characters were portrayed in the recent Avengers movies.

Andrew: Okay, yes.

Jesse: Now, you also shared some similar disappointments with a couple of the characters, mainly the Black Widow, if I'm not mistaken.

Andrew: Correct. This is Scarlet Johansen playing the one female hero in The Avengers movies next to many other male characters. And, to be clear, you and I agree on a basic point, that is: We think there should be more strong female characters in many of these stories, and the conversation we're having is about what that looks like and what types of representations, what types of characters are best suited for these roles.

Jesse: Now, before we continue this conversation, let me just acknowledge the fact that you and I are two males in our early to mid-thirties...

Andrew: [chuckling] Right.

Jesse: ...Talking about what we think a strong female character looks like in a show.

Andrew: [laughing] Right. So you can just shut off the podcast now and stop listening, because we have no right to be having this conversation at all, but we're going to do it anyway...

Jesse: [laughing] For those who are still interested in practicing their English listening comprehension skill, please continue to listen on.

Andrew: [chuckling] Maybe the rage and insult that you feel from hearing us talk about this will motivate you to practice your English so you can tell us how we're wrong.

Jesse: Exactly! Yes. Good point! For the listening audience, if you have an opinion about this matter after listening to this, please share your opinion with us on the LPLE Facebook page. Know that we would love to hear your opinion about this.

If there's one thing that you and I agree on, as you just said, we would love to see more strong female characters represented on TV, in general.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: For the Black Widow character in the Avengers, if I remember correctly you weren't a fan of how she was portrayed.

Andrew: I like the character in the movies, but I don't like the way that she is underused in the main story lines of the movies. So, she is always present when the Avengers go and do something, but she is usually on the sidelines while someone like Captain America or Iron Man is doing all of the talking, and making a lot of the decisions, and fighting in most of the most complicated battles against enemies, and I wish that she had a more central role to play in the storylines.

Jesse: So, my opinion on the matter is I feel like she does have a central role to play in those movies; I'm not a fan of her delivery, of her acting. So, when you mentioned that she should have her own movie, I agree with you that the Black Widow should have her own movie, I'm just not a fan of that particular actress playing that character. So, let's take a look at Game of Thrones; I mentioned Game of Thrones. At our recent group dinner on Monday I came to you excited because I felt like I found a good comparison.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: The women on the show Game of Thrones, they don't have too much screen time; although, in this season I think they're having much more. For the limited amount of screen time that they have, I'm a big fan of both their plot position in the show because it's very prominent--I appreciate just how strong they are as a particular-... as that figure in that show, but more importantly I'm a big fan of their acting.

Andrew: Right. And, I don't disagree. I think that the Game of Thrones characters are growing and developing very well, and they are being shown very well in the show; and, I agree, also, that the acting being done in most of those cases is very, very good. So, we agree on all of those points.

I think that if there is a disagreement, it is about whether or not that is the only way to present a strong female character or not. And, I think where you and I disagree on Black Widow--part of it may be a preference for the actress, which is just personal between you and me, and the other part might have a little bit to do with the character that she is playing and whether that character is bold, and loud, and in-your-face, or more of a subdued personality as a character that might be making her performance less interesting to watch.

Jesse: The Black Widow's character, by nature, is supposed to be somewhat subdued, right?

Andrew: Yes. She usually tries to stay out of conflicts until absolutely necessary. And, while she has her own opinions, she is not as invested necessarily in the outcomes of some of the disputes that happened in the movies that she's in. And, I think that, to my mind, contributes to why she is less forceful, and less forward, and less commanding like many of the Game of Thrones characters are.

Jesse: Do you think that if she had her own movie that that would change? I think by nature, because she is a spy, she can't really engage too much. I mean, it would sound like she would be the female version of Jason Bourne in The Bourne Identity, to some extent, right?

Andrew: Right. I agree, and what I think would be different about a Black Widow movie that is standing alone is that instead of being a character in other people's stories--like she is in Captain America movies or Avengers movies--she would have a chance to be the main character in her own story, and she might have a much stronger opinion and an opportunity to be much more forceful in those stores.

Jesse: Well, to that extent, I really do hope that Marvel gives some consideration, like you suggested, to creating a Black Widow movie. I like Scarlett Johansson, I think, in general, she's a fantastic actress. I feel as though her role in this movie is challenged given the nature of her character. But, nevertheless, it does warrant some consideration for an individual spinoff Black Widow movie.

Andrew: I have heard rumors that they are planning to make one, and I can't wait to see it.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

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