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LPLE

LPLE is a podcast dedicated to helping people who are learning English practice their English listening skill. Jesse and Andrew, LPLE show hosts and native English speakers, have a regular native English conversation, and speak slowly and clearly so that the listeners can better understand the conversation.
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Now displaying: March, 2016
Mar 23, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Andrew talks about hiking and enjoying the natural beauty of Washington State. Jesse talks about his hobby of salsa dancing, and how it helps him exercise.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

TRANSCIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Andrew!

Andrew: Jesse!

Jesse: Tell me, what do you like to do on the weekend?

Andrew: On the weekend, most of the time I am trying to catch up on exercise because I work at an office and sit or stand at a desk most of the day. So, on the weekend, usually I'm trying to find a way to go outside and hike in the mountains or go for a run depending on who is available to join me in these activities.

Jesse: Nice! Living in Seattle, there's many places to go hiking nearby.

Andrew: Yes! We're very close to a lot of mountains, and for running there are beaches and a lot of pretty scenery to look at when you're outside.

Jesse: Tell me, why do you like hiking?

Andrew: I like hiking because it is close and also because it is good exercise with new things to look at each time you go out. So, for example, if I were to go on a run near my house, I would have to run by the same things everyday and it gets boring. When I go out hiking I can go in a different direction each day. I will drive to a different mountain, and I can climb to the top and see different views, and also there are different trails with different conditions. So, some are rocky, some are dusty, sometimes there is snow, and that makes each hike new and fresh.

Jesse: When you go hiking, do you like to take a lot of pictures?

Andrew: Yes, usually-... Well, on the pretty days I like to take pictures. At the top, if it is sunny and bright and you can see clearly for a long way, the pictures look amazing and you can see not just the mountains nearby but sometimes very far away. Even if the hike is a long way away from the city, like 30 or 60 minutes drive away, sometimes you can still see from the top of the mountain the skyscrapers in the city of Seattle, or our famous mountain, Mount Rainier, nearby all the way away down to the south and east.

Jesse: When you go hiking, how long do you usually hike and what do you usually bring with you?

Andrew: That's a good question. The hikes are sometimes nearby and they take only 30 to 45 minutes to drive to. But, sometimes when I go with more enthusiastic friends we might go somewhere further away that might take two or three hours to get to by car. Once we're there, usually we are hiking for about four or five miles up and then four or five miles back, and that takes about two or three hours to go up, and then it is usually a little bit faster to go downhill back to the car. So, these are long trips; they take most of a day to complete, between the driving and the hiking. That means that you need to bring food and prepare to be out all day. So, we dress in layers to stay warm while we're cool and to take some of them off when we are working hard and get hot and sweaty. And, we also take water and snacks like granola bars or chips. We will also bring a meal sometimes for the top, a sandwich or something like that, for lunch, and we usually bring extra just in case something might happen, or if we meet someone else who does not have enough food along the way.

Jesse: Who do you usually go hiking with? How many friends and how often?

Andrew: It depends on the season. In the summer, it is warmer so we can get to more places that are not covered with snow and ice and are dangerous to drive to. And, in the winter, sometimes with extra preparation--bringing things like snow shoes or spikes to put on your shoes so we don't slip--we can go out into snow hikes. During the summer, we usually try to hike once every one or two weeks, usually on the weekend. And, in the winter, it is probably closer to once each month.

Jesse: Nice. When are you going to go hiking again this year?

Andrew: Right now, I am training for some runs, so I am running more than I am hiking. But, once the weather warms up again, it is January now, so maybe April or May I will probably start hiking again more regularly.

Jesse: Excellent. During the weekend, my favorite hobby is salsa dancing. I've been salsa dancing for about 10 years now. And, it's a very invigorating activity. Invigorating means I use lots of energy, I use a lot of body energy, I'm moving around a lot.

Andre: And, how does it make you feel?

Jesse: It feels like--... Probably it feels the same way you feel when you're jogging. You're breathing heavily, you're sweating, your heart is beating very fast--your heart is racing. But, it's also very fun for me. So, it's a similar activity in that I can move my body around a lot, but it's also very fun because I get to listen to very, very fun and exciting music, and I can be creative, matching my body movement and dance steps to the music, and also I get to make new friends and meet old friends. In Seattle, we have a salsa dancing community. That means that whenever there's a salsa event during the week, there is a good chance that I will meet the same people again and again and again. And, because I get to meet them multiple times, I learn their name, I learn more about them, and then we become friends. So, now it feels like I'm not dancing with strangers all the time, but I'm dancing with people who I feel very comfortable with. It's a very fun activity.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Mar 23, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about how they celebrated Christmas and the turn of the New Year. Jesse introduces the concept of a "bachelor party."

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

TRANSCIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Andrew.

Andrew: Jesse.

Jesse: Happy New Year!

Andrew: Same to you.

Jesse: We are in January; it is 2016. I'm curious, how was your holiday vacation back in December?

Andrew: Very good. It has been a busy couple of weeks, but I had a lot of time to visit family and friends, and, so, in addition to the Christmas holiday at the end of December, I also went to a wedding that happened on New Year's Eve, and then celebrated the New Year before coming back to work in January.

Jesse: That's fantastic! Whose wedding?

Andrew: This was a wedding for two of my good friends who live across the border in Canada. We are here in Seattle, and the wedding and the New Year's Eve celebration we had was up in Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada, about 2 to 3 hours drive away.

Jesse: How long did you stay in Canada?

Andrew: Let me see... We went up the day before New Year's Eve, so December 30th, the wedding was on December 31st, and, so, we had the wedding ceremony during the day, and after the wedding was finished we went to downtown Vancouver to watch the fireworks at midnight to celebrate the New Year, and then went home with lots of traffic in the early morning of January 1st.

Jesse: For New Year's celebration, every year my wife and I go to our friends' house. Our friend lives in a neighborhood called Capitol Hill. They live in an apartment and their apartment has a rooftop that people can go on to to have a beautiful view of downtown Seattle.

Andrew: So, this is a tall building on a tall hill in the middle of the city.

Jesse: Correct.

Andrew: And there's a good view of the downtown city area where the fireworks happen.

Jesse: Yes. So, we hung out at a friends' place for a few hours. And then, 15 minutes before midnight we took a bottle of champagne, we went up to the rooftop, and we waited for the fireworks. The fireworks event was happening at a place in downtown called Seattle Center. On the rooftop of our friend's apartment there were many people, so it was a little bit crowded. However, we had enough space to have a clear view of the Space Needle.

Andrew: That's great!

Jesse: So, we waited, and then when it was New Year's we all drink champagne and we gave each other a hug, we wished each other "Happy New Year," and then after that I quickly went back inside the house because it is very cold outside...

Andrew: ...in December in Seattle, yeah.

Jesse: How was your Christmas?

Andrew: My Christmas was also very good. It was a little bit busy because this was the first year that my girlfriend and I were trying to see both my parents and her parents all on the holiday. So, on Christmas Eve we went down to my parents' house, which is about 30 minutes away, and spend the night there to get up in the morning, and exchange gifts, and have a Christmas dinner meal in the middle of the day. And, my dad's parents--my grandparents--were also there to celebrate with us.

And then, we had to leave that evening to go to her parents' house up north of the city, about an hour away. So, there was a lot of driving involved, but we got to see everyone and have dinner with both sides and get back in time to jump into the other activity that I had to fit into this busy season, which was the bachelor party for my friend who was getting married. So, December 25th and 26th it was Christmas celebrations, and December 27th and 28th, which was the weekend, my friend from Vancouver came to Seattle with some friends, and we went around the city to drink and celebrate his wedding that was coming up very soon.

Jesse: Let's explain a bachelor party really quickly. A bachelor party in American society is when the groom--the guy who is, the man who is going to get married--has a party with his guy friends before the wedding. Sometimes it's the night before the wedding...

Andrew: And that's a bad idea [haha].

Jesse: Sometimes it's the week before the wedding. Sometimes it can even be a couple of months before the wedding. Typically a groom has a bachelor party, and usually a bachelor party includes drinking alcohol and beer, going out into the city, or...or even going to a destination, a far away place like a cabin or...

Andrew: Another city to take a vacation.

Jesse: Exactly.

Andrew: And, usually there are other activities to celebrate the occasion of his getting married like going out to dance, or going to a show, or celebrating at someone's house. We did a lot of those things and had a very good time. Although, some of the guests had a little bit too much to drink and had headaches the next day, they had a hangover.

I believe the bride also had her version of this party, so she had a bachelorette party that was up in Vancouver. So, they were separated to celebrate on their own independently, and then came back together for the wedding the next week.

Jesse: Typically, for a bachelor party there are no women in the group

Andrew: Correct.

Jesse: Likewise, typically, for a bachelorette party for the bride there are no men in the group, it's only women.

Andrew: Correct.

Jesse: For my Christmas holiday, it was very relaxing. We had Christmas dinner at my wife's family's house. They live very nearby. And then, throughout the day I relaxed at home and watched four movies.

Andrew: [haha] That's a long...a long day!

Jesse: Four movies, back-to-back-to-back-to-back.

Andrew: Eight hours or so of film?

Jesse: Yes. Whenever I have a holiday vacation like Christmas, or like Thanksgiving, or like New Year's, I like to spend time watching movies at home. It's a chance for me to catch up on many movies that I missed over the past four or five years.

Andrew: Four or five years?

Jesse: Yeah! Not just this past year, but over the past few years. So, I stayed at home watching movies and just relaxing. That was it.

Andrew: Sounds like a good time and a good way to relax before coming back to work and your normal life after the holiday.

Jesse: Exactly.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Mar 23, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about their coffee and tea preferences, and what it was like to experience tea and coffee in different countries.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Andrew: Last night, my girlfriend and I went to dinner and a movie, and we went to eat at an Indian style restaurant. And, at this restaurant they serve tea Indian style, which they called chai, and they're very nice about making sure that you always have a full cup, so I love going there.

But, while we were eating, it made me think about all of the different ways that coffee and tea are served in different cultures and places in the world. I take my Indian tea hot with milk and sugar so it's sweet and creamy, and I've always had it that way. My girlfriend asked me at dinner why I like drinking tea with milk and sugar when I like drinking my coffee black without any milk and without any extra sweetness in it. And, she's right; I like my coffee bitter but hot, and I like my tea creamy and sweet.

But, there's actually a lot of different ways to take coffee or to take tea and it varies by custom. When I'm in Vietnam, for example, or eating at a Vietnamese restaurant even in the United States, they serve Vietnamese coffee, which means a different kind of coffee; it's brewed stronger they brew it into the glass that you're going to drink it directly, and they pour it over condensed milk, so again it is creamy and sweet, and usually you serve it with ice, so it's actually cold. So, I like coffee and both of these cases.

But, in my morning routine when I am having breakfast and getting ready for the day, the kind of coffee I want is black and bitter, and I only want coffee Vietnamese-style when it is served at a Vietnamese restaurant with a Vietnamese meal or when I'm visiting the country directly. And, I think that's true of most people, so I wanted to ask you how you take your coffee and how you like to drink at another places.

Jesse: That's a really good question. Let me just say that on rare occasion will I ever drink drip pour coffee straight black. So, if I go to Starbucks and I ordered a tall drip [coffee], I will always put a little bit of half-and-half [milk] and one package of sugar--raw sugar, the thick, brown granulated sugar.

Andrew: This is raw sugar, but it's not molasses sugar, right? This is just...

Jesse: Right, it comes in that brown package, I think, it's called Sugar In The Raw. I can't remember the name.

Andrew: Right. This is a form of unrefined white sugar.

Jesse: Right. Whenever I have drip coffee, it's always with that small combination; a little bit of cream or milk and a little bit of sugar--just the right taste. When I'm in Vietnam, it's always iced coffee with condensed milk. On rare occasion if I'm in someplace cold like Da Lat or in the winter time, then I'll remove the ice; then you could take it just straight drip coffee with condensed milk, hot. Generally speaking, when I'm at a Vietnamese restaurant here in Seattle, it's always the iced...Vietnamese iced coffee. In fact, that Vietnamese iced coffee is very popular among non-Vietnamese, because they know it is very, very strong right.

One of my favorite memories with coffee and tea was when I was in India. So, remember, back in the MBA program at the University of Washington, we had Study Tours, right?

Andrew: I went to Brazil and you went to India, yes?

Jesse: No, well you went to Brazil and I led China...I co-lead China. Right before, in our first year I went to India as a participant. And, in India, by luck, I was going to be in India during the time that one of my friends was getting married--one of my Indian friends was getting married.

Andrew: You got to go to an Indian wedding?

Jesse: I got to go to a traditional Sikh wedding. So, when we think of Indian weddings we think of the big parties, very, very elaborate. And, I'm sure he had that, but, from what I remember and what I understand, this was a wedding that took place over a few days and the Sikh part of it, this one was more religious, a religious ceremony at his house. Smaller, intimate; close friends and family.

Andrew: How many people, about?...

Jesse: I want to say about 50 to 70 people there.

Andrew: That's the "small" version?...[hahaha]

Jesse: And then, after that, there was a wonderful banquet afterwards in his backyard. And, I remember one of the wait staff coming around with a big jar of chai tea.

Andrew: This is served hot with milk?

Jesse: Hot with milk, correct. He'll give you a clay--a very, very rough feeling, very rough clay cup. A small cup. A very, very small cup. If you think of that Chinese tea cups that you get at a Chinese restaurant--about that size, if not smaller. And then, he'll pour it, and then you just sip it. Unlike my natural tendency to shoot it as if it were an alcoholic shot, use just casually sip on it. And, mind you, it is a very hot day, so you're not trying to consume a lot of hot liquid at one time. That was delicious; I made sure to find him again multiple times during my visit to my friend's house to get more of that chai tea. Very, very good!

Andrew: Excellent. I think it's funny, the different ways we expect to receive our drinks depending on where we are and our circumstances. Even in the United States, the way people drink tea is different by custom. In Seattle, here, we're usually drinking tea as a substitute for coffee because we have a strong coffee culture.

Jesse: Right.

Andrew: And, so, we take our tea hot in water and maybe with sugar. And, that's different from, for example, how it is taken in the United Kingdom or in Britain, where the expectation is that tea is served hot with milk, for example. Or, even in the south or the southern part of the United States where tea is served as a refreshing drink in the hot summers where it's almost always iced tea and it's very, very, very sweet. So, they add lots and lots of sugar. And, if you asked for tea in, for example, Georgia in the middle of the summer and you're expecting to get a hot chai or chamomile, potentially served with a little bit of sweet, you would be very disappointed to receive this, this cold beverage, instead.

Jesse: That's right. You raise an interesting point. For example, you go to--let's say you are an Indian native from India. You come over, you come to Georgia, you're invited to someone's house. And, someone asks, "would you like some tea?" And, in your mind, you have one definition of the word "tea." You--when you think of tea, you think of it based on your culture and the context of your culture, based on your experience with tea from your native country. And then, when you're served, chances are it's cold and in a big glass with lots of sugar and a slice of lime.

Andrew: Right. Think about how disappointed you would be, right?

Jesse: Absolutely. One of the interesting coffee-tea combinations here in Seattle that I really enjoy and that I also want to recommend is 'matcha latte.'

Andrew: 'Matcha latte.' What goes into a matcha latte?

Jesse: "Matcha" is Japanese-style green tea. That takes care of the 'tea' side, right? And then, 'latte' is your standard form, your regular espresso-style drink.

Andrew: Regular in Seattle. So, that is pressure-brewed coffee, very strong, mixed with hot steamed milk.

Jesse: Right, exactly.

Andrew: And then, so, matcha co-... matcha latte?...

Jesse: Yes.

Andrew: A matcha latte, if I'm understanding right, is tea instead of the coffee? Or is it tea plus coffee and the steamed milk?

Jesse: Tea plus coffee--... matcha green tea powder mixed in with an actual latte with the caffeine. That's my understanding.

Andrew: OK. So it has both. You're getting a little bit of both sides at the same time.

Jesse: Yes. And the matcha latte comes out green. So, for anyone unfamiliar with drinking anything that has a green color to it, I think people who drink matcha latte for the first time are a little scared.

Andrew: Right. Of the color...

Jesse: Of the color, right. However, when you drink it, it's--... it's absolutely delicious. A little sweet. It has the green tea flavor and yet has the warm texture and feel of a latte. Overall, I highly recommend it. There's a few places in Seattle that serve matcha latte.

Andrew: Is this a Starbucks option or do you have to go somewhere locally?

Jesse: No. You have to go to a small café. The café I like to go to is called Panama Cafe. Panama Cafe is in the International District in Seattle, and there, that's the only place I know right now that has matcha latte. Now, before, a few years ago, Starbucks used to sell--and I still think that they do sometimes, maybe during the summer--Starbucks sells a matcha Frappuccino, and that came from Japan. I remember--... I remember--this is going to sound very hipster--I remember drinking matcha Frappuccino in Japan before it was ever introduced to the American Starbucks.

Andrew: ...And then you came back and they brought it to the stores in Seattle.

Jesse: Yes. I think they brought it back from me. I don't know.

Andrew: [hahaha] But you like them. The Frappuccino is a sweet--... Almost like a sweet milkshake kind of drink, right?

Jesse: Yes. Coffee milkshake, yeah.

Andrew: ...With whipped cream on top?

Jesse: Yes.

Andrew: And, so they added the matcha power to that, as well.

Jesse: Yes. So it's green. It's very green. It's tastes delicious. I highly recommend it. If you're ever in Japan or here in Seattle during the summer, I recommend you try it.

Andrew: I'll have to try the matcha latte or matcha Frappuccino soon.

Jesse: Great.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Mar 20, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!" Jesse and Andrew, your LPLE hosts, talk about their favorite foods and travel experience.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

Transcript

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Andrew, what is your favorite food?

Andrew: Pizza is the first thing that comes to mind.

Jesse: Why do you like pizza? Why is that your favorite food?

Andrew: I think it has all of the things that are unhealthy for me and all of the things that taste good all at the same time.

Jesse: For me, I also like pizza. But, I like my pizza to be very simple--Not a lot of ingredients. My favorite pizza is pepperoni and sausage; very basic, very simple, any pizza place has it. What is your favorite kind of pizza?

Andrew: I think I am the same. I usually order pepperoni and sausage and cheese. I also like pizzas that have everything on it. Everything on the menu, though; pepperoni, sausage, peppers, onions. They call it a supreme usually; a supreme pizza.

Jesse: When people think of a popular pizza, they usually think Chicago or New York; most likely New York over Chicago...

Andrew: Most likely Chicago over New York.

Jesse: Exactly. That's one of the funniest debates when it comes to food between two cities: it's who has the best pizza in New York or Chicago

Andrew: It's a point of pride.

Jesse: Very two--two very different styles of pizza. New York pizza is very wide and very thin, right? And, in Chicago, has their Chicago deep-dish pizza, which actually doesn't really resemble a pizza once you cut into it.

Andrew: It is more like a meat and cheese pie that is baked all together with sauce and spices. It is delicious.

Jesse: I preferred New York pizza, and I've had both. I've tried Chicago deep-dish pizza and I've tried New York pizza, and I favor New York pizza. Sometimes I also eat fast food delivery pizza. But, yet again, here is a point of difference between you and me. Between Domino's Pizza and Pizza Hut, I prefer Pizza Hut.

Jesse: Alright, let's talk about travel.

Andrew: OK.

Jesse: Most recently, a couple of months ago, I travelled to Japan. That was my most recent international trip. I was in Japan for one week and it was very fun. The weather was hot. It was the end of summer, so of course it was also very humid. But, I still had a great time. I got to see friends. I got lots of delicious Japanese food. I got to sing karaoke--very fun. And, I did a little sightseeing. Not a lot, only a little. Primarily because when I lived in Japan about 10 years ago, I live in Japan for 3 months. So I had plenty of opportunity to sightsee. So, what about you? What was your most recent international trip?

Andrew: I haven't travel internationally in a little while. The last trip I took was about two years ago, but it was a longer trip so I got to see more places. I was traveling with a friend and we went through many countries in Southeast Asia. We flew to Laos, and then took a train to Thailand, and then flew to Bali/Indonesia, and from there I actually met up with you in Vietnam for the last week of our trip. And, I had a great time. I actually miss traveling and I want to do it again soon. I'm actually planning another trip back to Thailand early next year.

Jesse: Why are you going back to Thailand? There's many other countries in the world for you to travel. Thailand is a fantastic country. You're going back. Is there something about Thailand that you really like? Is it more to introduce Thailand to somebody else?

Andrew: Both, actually. Thailand is a great place to start traveling because the people are very friendly and there are a lot of hotels and tour guides and is easy to get around to travel to see sites and see the country. And, I'm also traveling with some friends who have not traveled outside of the United States very often and so this is a good place to start. So, I'm happy to go back. I love Thailand. I'm also excited to show parts of Southeast Asia to friends who haven't been there before. And, this is a good chance to do both of those things at once.

Jesse: How long is your trip this time?

Andrew: We are going for a little bit less than two weeks, so I think about ten to twelve days. And, we are going to start out in Bangkok, we're going to spend a few days at a city by the beach, and then for some of them--some of the people I'm traveling with who are leaving early--we are going to go to Singapore for a few days to show them the city. And then my girlfriend and I are going to stay and go back to Thailand to go to the north part of the country to a town called Chiang Mai and see more of what the north part of the country has, which is different weather, different culture, and just a different feeling than the big city of Bangkok.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM

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