Info

LPLE

LPLE is a podcast dedicated to helping people who are learning English practice their English listening skill. Jesse and Andrew, LPLE show hosts and native English speakers, have a regular native English conversation, and speak slowly and clearly so that the listeners can better understand the conversation.
RSS Feed
LPLE
2017
December
November
October
September
August
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


Categories

All Episodes
Archives
Categories
Now displaying: 2016
Dec 27, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane welcome to the show special guests Maxima Patashnik and Clara Cantor of The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle to talk about the Hanukkah holiday being celebrated December 24, 2016 through January 1, 2017. Max and Clara explain the origins of the holiday, how it is celebrated today, and where both Jews and non-Jews can celebrate Hanukkah together in the city, as well as how The Jewish Federation of Great Seattle promotes and supports the Jewish community and faith through a wide variety of activities, events and advocacy efforts.

Learn more about The Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle: jewishinseattle.org

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world. 

Dec 19, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane explain what a conversation exchange partner is and share how they found their own partners. Jane found hers in France. Jesse found his through the University of Washington Conversation Exchange Program and through conversationexchange.com. Jesse shares tips on how to have a successful conversation partner experience.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Dec 12, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane share what they did during the Thanksgiving holiday and review the differences between asking personal questions in America and in different countries. Jesse remembers being asked about his personal life and marriage status when he was in Vietnam. Jane remembers being asked if she had children when she was in Indonesia.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Dec 6, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane share their plans for Thanksgiving. Jane will host a special dinner party for her close friends, and Jesse and his wife will make food for the nearby homeless community. Jesse gives a brief explanation about the original history of Thanksgiving.

Nov 27, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Recorded the day after the November 8, 2016 US Presidential Election, Jesse and Jane share their thoughts and feelings, as well as explain where they were and what they did during the night of the actual election.

Nov 21, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane explain and practice (through role playing) the proper and culturally polite ways to order food and drink at restaurants and cafes using "may I," "can I," and "can I get" in different situations.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Nov 15, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane talk about why the word "should" can sometimes be rude and impolite, and they teach you other words you can say to give suggestions and recommendations.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

Nov 9, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane reflect on their experiences traveling and trying to fit in. Jane talks about her experiences being a white American woman living in France and Romania, and Jesse talks about being a brown American man living in Japan and Vietnam. They both agree that it's not important to fit in; it's important to have fun being who you are.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Nov 2, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane explain why Americans aren't as direct as many non-Americans believe, and they explore why and how native English speakers use the conditional format "if/then" to express regret or remorse. 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Oct 9, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Jane talk about the importance of understanding context when listening to English conversations and share their own experiences learning and listening in Japanese and French. Jesse and Jane also encourage the listeners to relax and not worry if they cannot understand everything native speakers say.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Oct 3, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!" 

Jesse introduces LPLE's new co-host, Jane Cater, professional ESL instructor. Jane and Jesse explain how native English speakers use taste (sweet, sour, spicy, bitter, and bland) and temperature (cold, warm, hot, and cool) to describe people.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Sep 13, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about the importance of knowing and respecting different dating and relationship cultures, which includes arranged marriages in India, to freely dating multiple people, to monogamous dating. Jesse encourages both men and women to date multiple people at one time before getting married so as to better learn about themselves. Andrew shares a little bit about his dating history.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Sep 5, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Put up for sale. Put out by his comments. She gave me a mean put down... English can sometimes be very confusing! Jesse and Andrew explain all of the different meanings and ways to use the word "put."

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Aug 31, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!" 

Jesse and Andrew talk about data that OkCupid, an online dating application, released that shows how White men prefer Asian women and vice versa. Jesse explains his relief of not having to do online dating, and Andrew explains how our modern behavior is different from traditional ways of meeting and dating people.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Aug 27, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!" 

Jesse and Andrew talk about the recent legalization of marijuana in Washington State, which means that people can now legally buy, sell, own, and use marijuana.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Jul 21, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Andrew explains what microbrew beers are, and why we enjoy them so much. Jesse and Andrew also talk about nanobrews and homebrews, which are beers that we can make at home on our own, and our favorite microbeer store/bar called Chucks!

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

TRANSCRIPT 

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: You just came back from Vancouver BC in Canada.

Andrew: I did, yes.

Jesse: And during that time, it sounded like you had your fair share of microbrews.

Andrew: I did, actually, which is good news for me because I'm a huge fan of beers that are made in a style that is not the common Budweiser, light lager style of the type that you can buy in almost every country.

Jesse: One of the things I want to talk about in this episode is microbrews because microbrews is something that you and I really enjoy.

Andrew: Yes, and I think people in our city, in Seattle, are actually very fond of this style of beer in general.

Jesse: So, let's start with what is a microbrew. How would you define a microbrew?

Andrew: Sure. I will start by defining a macrobrew, which is to say large companies like InBev, Anheuser-Busch, SABMiller, etc., who make very popular beers that are made in very large batches and distributed very widely. You might have heard of Budweiser, or Heineken, or Miller, or Corona; these are beers that are made by very large companies, they are made to taste the same wherever you go, wherever you get them, and they're very popular. But, they are also very plain to taste because they have to appeal to a lot of different people. Think about, like, for example, Coca-Cola, which is made everywhere, and always stays the same, and everyone likes it. If you like unique flavors or different flavors of soda, you might have to look for a smaller company that makes a more interesting soda, but doesn't sell it everywhere; and, microbrews are the same idea with beer. They are small companies--or even people doing this is as a hobby--that are making beers that have interesting and new flavors, that don't follow the same recipe rules that a Budweiser or a Corona might, and it gives you many different and interesting options to try when you go to a restaurant or to a bar in a place that carries them. And, the Pacific Northwest, which includes Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada, and also Seattle, Washington and Portland, Oregon in the United States, are all cities that have been very supportive of microbrews coming up and being sold right alongside the big names like Budweiser.

Jesse: "Macro" means "big," "micro" means "small," and the word "brew" is another word for "beer."

Andrew: Ah, "brewing" is the process that is used to make beer, much like "baking" is the process used to make bread.

Jesse: So, microbrews are pretty popular in Vancouver BC, Seattle, Washington, Portland, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest, and also parts of California, as well.

Andrew: Oh, yes. Definitely. The entire west coast of North America tends to make very flavorful, very hoppy beers that are not the normal style that is made in the big companies. Other towns have taken this up; Austin, Texas is known for it, Denver and Boulder Colorado make a lot of beers, and also many cities on the East Coast, although I have not been to them to try their own local flavors.

Jesse: What are the main ingredients in a beer? When you think about making your own beer, and you, Andrew, have actually made your own beer before...

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: ...What are the main ingredients that you can control in a beer?

Andrew: Beer is actually very simple in terms of the number of ingredients. All you need is grain, and water, and hops. And, hops are a flowering vine whose bud, the flower part of the plant, contains a lot of very strongly flavored oils that almost make a kind of tea with the water and the grain. Most beers are made with barley, but you can also find them made with corn and rice; so if you buy a Budweiser, it is made mostly with rice as the grain. All you're doing is extracting the sugars from the grain and then using yeast to process the sugar into alcohol. And, what makes the flavor of a beer unique is the combination of the type of yeast, the type of grain, and the number and types of hop that you put into the mash, which is the yeast and grain mixture.

Jesse: Now, the word "extraction" means "to take out," right?

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: So, you're trying to take out the sugar from the rice, or the corn, or the...

Andrew: Barley.

Jesse: ...or the barley.

Andrew: Or wheat, sometimes.

Jesse: Now, isn't the water also really important? The quality of the water?

Andrew: It is definitely true that some places have more flavorful water than others. So, depending on where your water is from, it might have more sulfur in it, it might be more clear, or in some places like big cities such as Los Angeles, California the water is very processed and cleaned and doesn't have a very crisp or clear flavor, and that definitely impacts the flavor of the beer, unless you treat the water or clean it; and, so it depends on what the brewery does to prepare the water before the beer is made.

Jesse: When I went to Vietnam a couple of months ago, one of the things I was really excited about was that in Ho Chi Minh City they have a microbrewery.

Andrew: One...

Jesse: One, which is a big step for many reasons. One, it means that there are more people in Vietnam who are exploring different tastes. The popular beers in Vietnam are Heineken, Tiger, Saigon Beer, Hanoi Beer, and these are macrobrews, right?

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: They're made in large quantities and sold throughout the country, if not the entire region of Southeast Asia.

Andrew: Right, and they also have the same characteristics of most of those more popular, more broadly distributed beers, and that is that they are very mild in flavor and in taste, and so there is a lot of room to make things more interesting with a microbrew where you can use more specific ingredients to get something interesting.

Jesse: There was a small microbrew bar in District 2 that I went to. Now, their selection was very small--that's fine. They had about 10 or 12 different kinds of microbrew, and I had the chance to try about three. I was really excited because, again, you and I really appreciate microbrews. I think the biggest challenge that microbrews have in Vietnam, especially at a bar, is being able to serve them cold. Now it's of course very hot in Vietnam, and you want your beers to remain as cold as possible.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: However, when you order a pint of a microbrew in Vietnam, it gets warm really quickly...

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: ...and the common practice in Vietnam is to put ice in your beer...

Andrew: Oh no...

Jesse: But, you don't do that with microbrews; that ruins everything about how the beer was made and the flavor, right?

Andrew: It definitely changes the balance and makes the flavor weaker. And, much like watering down tea or watering down coffee makes it taste less rich and less full, the same thing happens with beer. And, especially beer because beer is carbonated--they're the fizzy bubbles in it--and when you put the ice in it removes most of that carbonation, and the bubbles actually have a flavor to them. The carbon dioxide tastes a bit bitter, and it adds to the overall taste, and when you put the ice in, it gets more watery, less flavorful, and less bitter, all at the same time, which never works out well.

Jesse: One of the things I really love about our city is that we can legally make our own beer.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: We can't sell it, right? But, we can make it and share it with friends.

Andrew: Right, it's called "home brewing" or "homebrew."

Jesse: Right, so we have macrobrew, microbrew, we also have nanobrew, and then we have homebrew.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: Again, the homebrew cannot be sold to anybody. Macro, micro, and nano can.

Andrew: And, nanobrew..."nano" just means "very small," whereas "micro" means "small," so it's an even smaller brewery. And, really the only difference between a nano brewery and a home brewery is that they have gotten the permission to sell the beer that they make, as well as be making it in a small establishment, or even a kitchen.

Jesse: How many times have you make beer at your house?

Andrew: Oh gosh. Probably 10-20 times.

Jesse: And, what is your favorite style of beer that you make at your house?

Andrew: I almost always make IPAs, which stands for India Pale Ale. It is a type of recipe for beer that uses a lot of very strong hops in it. And the reason for that is that originally the hops were added to the beer because it keeps the beer safe to drink even if the water has gone bad. So, on long ship voyages, the British would bring beer along for the trip, but it would go bad unless they added extra hops. And, so this style of beer was sent on the ships that were going all the way across the world to India, the very long trips where the normal beer would go bad. That style has been taken over by the western United States and western Canada, and they have made it even more strong and even more flavorful, and the hops they use are even richer and have even more interesting tastes to them. And, that has become the main style that is made here and then my very favorite style, as well.

Jesse: In Seattle, we have a lot of microbreweries, and we even have a few nanobreweries, as well.

Andrew: Oh, many. Yes.

Jesse: Our favorite store to go to is a place called Chucks.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: And at Chucks they have fifty different kinds of microbrews on tap.

Andrew: Right, and they're different every time because they bring one batch in, and as soon as it's empty they bring another one to replace it. So, there's always something new to try.

Jesse: Right. If you ever visit Seattle, and for the listening audience I hope you do, when you come to Seattle, if you like beer, or even if you're curious about different kinds of beer, talk to us. We will happily take you to Chucks.

Andrew: I can't wait to see you.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jul 11, 2016

Hi everyone, this is Jesse Robbins, host of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English. Thank you for downloading this solo read episode of LPLE. In these solo read episodes, I will read to you news articles related to previous topics Andrew and I discuss in previous episodes. I will also read to you articles related to my wonderful city of Seattle.

-----------

As a follow up to episode number 10, I want to read to you an article about online dating and ethnicity. If you haven't heard that episode already, then we encourage you to listen to it before or after you listen to this episode.

The article is entitled "Multiracial Asian Americans 'Most Popular' in Online Dating Study" The article was written by Frances Kai-Hwa Wang from NBCnews.com, and it was published on July 13, 2015.

Follow the below link to read the full story, as well as learn new words and vocabulary, and improve your pronunciation and listening comprehension.

NBCnews.com
Multiracial Asian Americans 'Most Popular' in Online Dating Study http://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/multiracial-asian-americans-most-popular-online-dating-study-n389521
Published July 13 2015
By Frances Kai-Hwa Wang 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Jul 1, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Hi everyone, this is Jesse Robbins, host of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English. Thank you for downloading this solo read episode of LPLE. In these solo read episodes, I will read to you news articles related to previous topics Andrew and I discuss in previous episodes. I will also read to you articles related to my wonderful city of Seattle.

In today's solo read episode, I will read to you an article about Tesla, the popular electric car company, that we talked about in episode number 9. If you haven't heard that episode already, then we encourage you to listen to it before or after you listen to this episode.

The article is entitled "Tesla files for $2B stock sale to back Model 3; shares skid." The article was written by Christine Wang from CNBC.com, and it was published on May 18, 2016.

Follow the below link to read the full story, as well as learn new words and vocabulary, and improve your pronunciation and listening comprehension.

CNBC.com
Tesla files for $2B stock sale to back Model 3; shares skid
http://www.cnbc.com/2016/05/18/tesla-raising-2b-for-model-3-shares-plunge.html
Published May 18 2016
By Christine Wang

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Jun 21, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew reflect on their travels to Japan, and Jesse talks about his favorite thing to do when he's in Japan. 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: Before we begin, I'd like to say a special hello to students from two different schools now who are listening to LPLE to improve their English listening skills. Students from EKO English Pronunciation in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, and I also found out that we have some students from our local City University who are also using LPLE for their school assignments and, just in general, to improve their English listening comprehension. So, hello!

Andrew: That's great news! Welcome, folks!

Jesse: Andrew, one thing you and I have in common is we have both been to Japan.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: When did you go?

Andrew: It's been a while; I went back in 2008.

Jesse: So, that's about...

Andrew: Eight years ago?

Jesse: Yeah, that's right. A lot has changed since.

Andrew: I'm not surprised.

Jesse: The last time I was in Japan was last fall, and before that it had also been about eight years. Let me tell you, I love Japan. I think you feel the same way. 

Andrew: I really enjoyed my trip.

Jesse: There's a few things I really enjoy about Japan. Every time I go, I always have a wonderful time, and it's primarily because, one, I have friends there, and they always take really good care of me. In general, not just because I have friends, but Japanese people, in general, are very welcoming. Did you experience that yourself?

Andrew: That's very much what I experienced when I went there. Even just from people on the street, or the people you met in stores or on the train, they were all very kind and very accommodating, and I was going without any Japanese language experience--I was speaking only English--and they were very accommodating of my need to work in my own language and learn my way around the city and find out what I needed to do.

Jesse: So, very similar to my experience in Vietnam, because I can speak Japanese, I found that social barriers and any level of potential discomfort in interacting with a foreigner is immediately removed.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: It also makes it much easier for me to establish--to create--my own social network in Japan. That's why every time I go back to Japan, I always let my friends know in advance and then I start to schedule time with them to go have dinner, to go have drinks, and, more importantly--I would say probably most importantly--I make sure to schedule time to go to karaoke.

Andrew: Hahaha! That's the only reason you're going to Japan, isn't it, Jesse?...

Jesse: Let me tell you, if I ever lived in Japan, I sincerely believe that I would be going to karaoke probably every day, if not every other day. I love it that much when I'm in Japan. You know what's funny? I live here in Seattle, and we have plenty of karaoke places. There's actual places that are just for karaoke and then there are bars, and in bars, there are karaoke machines, and you stand up on a stage in front of people, and you sing. When I'm in Seattle, my desire to go to karaoke is pretty small; I don't think about it that much. When I'm in Japan, that's almost all I can think about--is "when am I going to be going to my next karaoke party?"

Andrew: Okay, so what is different about going to do karaoke in Japan that makes you so excited about it?

Jesse: Well, in Japan the entire system is different when it comes to karaoke. Again, in America, it's very common to stand up on a stage in front of strangers and sing.

Andrew: So you have to put on a performance for people you don't know.

Jesse: That's right. So, it feels very intimidating, especially for people who are new. However, in Japan, it's very different. All karaoke places have separate rooms that you rent, and the rooms vary on size: Some rooms are very small for only four people--actually maybe even smaller I hear, sometimes for only two people; very small--and they can be as large as enough to fit 10 people or 15 people; an actual big party. So, you're in a room with just your friends, so the level of intimidation and fear to sing in front of people is a lot lower, and even in those rooms, because you feel more comfortable then you can let yourself have a lot of fun, specifically in this particular room I went to last time they had a mini stage with a microphone stand, and you felt like you were giving a performance, but you were giving a performance to all of your friends who are cheering you on.

Now, not only do I speak Japanese but I also can sing in Japanese I will not touch you with my singing in Japanese right now you will have to come because I sing in Japanese and his friends and I'm a foreigner who can speak Japanese in Japanese and that much more amusing to watch them no. And it's a positive feedback loop because I'm having fun and my friends are having fun and then cheering me on which makes me have that much more fun when I'm singing for them overall look I love Japan I love going to Japan I love speaking Japanese I love Japanese food I love Japanese culture music everything but if there's one thing I love the most about going to Japan it's going to karaoke.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 14, 2016

Jesse and Andrew talk about and analyze what President Obama's visit to Vietnam could mean for the United States and Vietnam's economic growth, including US allowing Vietnam to purchase weapons from the US, and VietJet Air's purchase of 100 Boeing airplanes.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: This has been an interesting week for our president, right? He is currently in Asia, East and Southeast Asia. Most recently, he's visited Vietnam.

Now, this makes me very excited for many, many reasons. Number one, I studied Vietnamese for three years and can speak it pretty well. Two, I actually lived in Vietnam for a total of one year: three months in Hanoi and about nine to ten months in Ho Chi Minh City. And, furthermore, this makes me excited because the nature of his trip went a bit beyond standard meet-and-greet diplomacy.

Andrew: Definitely.

Jesse: If I'm not mistaken there were some economic opportunities that he was trying to stimulate by going to Vietnam. Now, Vietnam recently had an election, so they have undergone some new political changes themselves. So, a new government is coming in, while in America our president is leaving. But, nevertheless, this created a really unique opportunity for the two countries to really think about the economic partnership that they can create.

Andrew: Definitely. They took this opportunity in a big way. The United States ended its embargo of selling arms to Vietnam, while the president was there. And, what that means is... Well, first, as background, for a long time since the end of the conflict in Vietnam where America was fighting a war there, the United States has made it forbidden for any American companies to sell weapons like guns or military aircraft to Vietnam; and, that embargo was lifted, meaning that companies like Boeing and Airbus and others can now sell their products in Vietnam for the first time.

Jesse: That is a huge deal. That's probably the first of many large economic opportunities that came from this trip. We could spend this entire episode just focused on that economic opportunity alone, about America lifting its arms embargo off of Vietnam, that America can now sell weapons to the Vietnamese government. It's worth remembering that America sells billions of dollars worth of arms to other countries. We are good at this; we as a country are good at manufacturing weapons and selling them to other countries. So, it sounds like Vietnam is going to be our newest customer. Now, the second thing that immediately came from this opportunity, from this visit was that VietJet Air placed an order for 100 Boeing airplanes. Now, of course VietJet Air and Boeing we're probably working on this contract well before the president came to Vietnam.

Andrew: Definitely.

Jesse: But, it sounds like they knew the president was coming, and so they decided to hold off on signing the contract until he got there so that the president could include that in his remarks about the economic opportunity between the two countries.

Andrew: It is a good symbol of the kind of commerce and economic cooperation between the countries that can happen in the years to come.

Jesse: Before now VietJet Air only purchased airplanes from Airbus. Airbus is a European company. Now, with this purchase of 100 airplanes from Boeing, that introduces economic opportunity for us. Here in the Northwest, in our city, Boeing is here. Boeing has offices here, but they also have manufacturing plants here. So their purchase a 100 planes is going to mean good things for our local economy.

Andrew: That's right. The factories that build the 737 they are going to sell are right here in town, which means that your company in Seattle is going to be selling airplanes to the cities you love in Vietnam.

Jesse: So as I think about Vietnam economic future, I foresee a lot more companies paying more attention to Vietnam, especially now after President Obama went to Vietnam. And that's great, because it sounds like Vietnam is a growing market.

When I lived there, it was extremely obvious that the education system is progressing very fast and there are a lot of educated, English-speaking, local Vietnamese there. I see in the future a lot of jobs being created in Vietnam, which also means that local companies here might be outsourcing some other work to Vietnam where the skill of labor might be equal but the wages are a lot lower in Vietnam.

Andrew: Right. It means a lot of opportunities for good paying jobs for Vietnamese working for American companies in the future as part of this economic cooperation.

Jesse: This kind of diplomatic exchange is very common. We know this. One of the big things that was happening that I think we in America did not hear much about was similar diplomatic relationships being created between a few countries in Africa and China.

Andrew: Yes. China is investing very heavily in Africa in the same way that America is investing in parts of Asia to build those connections and create those opportunities both for Chinese products being sold and used in Africa, but also for resources and jobs being developed in Africa for China.

Jesse: There are mutually beneficial reasons why countries engage in these kinds of diplomatic relationships. Sometimes country A has resources that country B wants, and sometimes country B creates many products that country A wants. And, so what they're doing is they're negotiating to make it easier for those two countries to get those goods and services and natural resources to each other in a way that is equitable, mutually beneficial, and looks good politically. Because, at the end of the day, politicians want to do things that are going to keep them in power, that are going to keep them in their offices, so of course it makes sense that they're going to do things that are going to help their people, so long as they remind their people that, "hey it was our party that helped increase your economic opportunity."

Andrew: I can't wait to see how much Vietnam has changed as a result of this new economic opportunity the next time we go back.

Jesse: That's right. We should plan another trip!

Andrew: And soon!

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 4, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse talks about taking his wife to Vancouver BC, Canada for the Night Market. Andrew gives Jesse recommendations on two good restaurants: Japadog and Banana Leaf. 

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world. 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: My wife and I are going to be taking a weekend vacation to Canada...

Andrew: Excellent.

Jesse: We call it a "weekend getaway." Now, this is because it was her birthday this week, and we were thinking about how we can celebrate. We also recognize that we haven't been to Canada in a while. We live in Seattle, so if we get in our car and drive, it really only takes us--assuming no traffic...

Andrew: ...About two to two-and-a-half hours.

Jesse: That's right. So, one of the things that my wife and I like to do when we travel is eat good food, and, as I understand it, in Canada--in Vancouver and in Richmond--there are all sorts of places for good food.

Andrew: That is totally right. Vancouver is actually very well known for its food in large part because there are a lot of different cultures and communities living within different parts of Vancouver; and, that means that you can get different styles of food from all different parts of the world in a very small space and try all kinds of things that you might not have access to if you are in a different city that doesn't have as many options.

As you said, Vancouver is very close to Seattle and the United States, so it shares a lot of cultures and customs and it is easy to travel to, but that also means that it has a lot of the same common foods that you would find here. You can get good hamburgers, you can get good steak, you can get a lot of traditional American dishes, but you also can get a lot of the ethnic dishes that you might not be able to find elsewhere. There is a very, very large Asian population in Vancouver and specifically in the suburb of Richmond, which is just to the south of the city, and that means that you can find all kinds of Vietnamese neighborhoods, and Chinese neighborhoods, and Japanese neighborhoods, and Thai neighborhoods, and almost every single kind of food you might find in Asia and Southeast Asia, in large parts of Africa, most of Europe, all of it is available in one place, and that makes for a really great food tourism trip.

Jesse: During this 3-day, 2-night weekend getaway, we've rented a house in Richmond. Now, luckily Richmond and Vancouver are right next to each other, right?

Andrew: Very close.

Jesse: We're going up to Richmond primarily for this thing called a "Night Market." This happens every year during the late-spring to mid-summer, I believe...

Andrew: Usually during the fair-weather months--the part of the year where it's not going to be too rainy, it's going to stay light longer, and it's easier to have a nightly event.

Jesse: Right. This is outdoors.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: So, it stands to reason that they want to have this night market during the times when the weather is going to be very nice. At this night market, there are lots of great Taiwanese, Mainland Chinese, and Hong Kong foods. So, we've rented a place nearby the night market, but we're also going to spend a lot of time in Vancouver. Now, before we get into what we're going to eat or where we should go, as I understand it, the exchange rate is pretty favorable for us.

Andrew: For Americans.

Jesse: For Americans.

Andrew: The Canadian dollar is not worth the same amount as the American dollar, even though we are living right next to each other. And, it actually moves, so relative to the American dollar, the Canadian Dollar might be worth more or less. And, a few years ago we were actually at parity, which means that the Canadian dollar is equal to the American dollar, so you could use one or the other and they were worth the same.

In each country, the prices don't change very much year over year. So, if you are making money in Canada and spending money in Canada, you don't notice this exchange rate. But, many people living in Vancouver might come to the United States to shop and vice-versa--Americans going to Canada to shop--depending on what that exchange rate is like. And, right now, fortunately for American tourists going to Canada, the Canadian dollar is cheap, which means they can use the same number of American dollars and buy more things in Canada.

Jesse: Now, you go up to Vancouver a lot--multiple times in one year.

Andrew: Yes. I have friends up there, so I have a place to go to stay, and I get to visit with my friends, and get to enjoy the good food, besides.

Jesse: So, not just for me, but also for the listening audience, if they go up to Vancouver, what are the, let's say, one or two, maybe at most three places that you would absolutely recommend that we go.

Andrew: So, one of the popular food cart style places that got its start in Vancouver--and Canada in general--that is worth going to see is called Japadog. And, this is a hot dog food cart that serves Japanese-style hot dogs, which means that instead of the more traditional toppings like onions, and mustard, and ketchup, there are a lot of different varieties of Japanese-inspired flavors that they put on these hot dogs. So, you can get different varieties of sauces like fish sauce, plum sauce, some tempura vegetables, and a lot of the same types of ingredients that might go into a teriyaki or sushi dish, mixed up with the hot dog, and it makes for a very interesting flavor. And, you can try different varieties between you and your wife, or you and your friends when you go.

My favorite place, though, is a more formal restaurant--not fancy just a place to go in, and sit down, and have a meal--and it serves Malaysian and Singaporean style food. That place is called Banana Leaf, and there are multiple locations around Vancouver, so it's easy to find one that is nearby. They make very, very good family style meals that you can put together. And, the set meal that I try to get when I go up is a combination of Rendang, which is Malaysian or Indonesian beef stew, and that comes as a side, I get Roti, which is the fried bread, up front with butter and peanut sauce to snack on. They bring coconut rice wrapped up in a steamed banana leaf to go with the Rendang, and they also have a white fish in black oyster sauce, I believe, that is cooked up beautifully. Oh, and, finally, as a vegetable side, they make Sambal Green Beans, which are crunchy, fried green beans in shrimp paste. And, for some reason, those combinations of flavors together in one meal are just about the best meal that I can find up there. And, I can't get it in Seattle, so I look forward to it every time I go up.

Jesse: That sounds fantastic. Andrew, if I could, I would buy that and bring it down for you when I come back to Seattle. But, I don't think I can.

Andrew: Sadly, I don't think there's going to be any left when you're done.

Jesse: One of the things I really enjoy eating when I'm in Vancouver is Chinese food, specifically soup dumplings. Soup dumplings are very popular here in Seattle. We have Din Tai Fung--now has two or three restaurants in the-... in the area. In Vancouver, there are many other places to get soup dumplings, and every time we go up, we always go to a small hole-in-the-wall restaurant. We usually have to wait in line for an hour because, again, it's a small restaurant...

Andrew: And it's so popular.

Jesse: ...And it is so popular, and we always order soup dumplings, and we always leave very satisfied. This is going to be a vacation; this is going to be three days of us gaining weight.

Andrew: Hahaha. I wouldn't have it any other way. I hope you have a good trip.

Jesse: Thank you.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

Jun 3, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about female heroes in action movies and television, and compare what they liked and disliked with the Black Widow character in the recent Avengers movie with the female heroes in Game of Thrones.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world. 

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hi, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: Over the past couple of weeks, you and I have been watching a lot of TV and a few movies.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: One of the conversations we had about TV and movies is the role of the women characters.

Andrew: Ahhh, yes.

Jesse: Now, you and I have had some pretty impassioned discussions about this; very passionate conversations. We have our opinions about what makes an ideal heroine character.

Andrew: Right. You mean-... I think you and I have been trying to find a way to agree on what makes for a powerful female lead character in a story and in a TV show, the heroin, the woman who is the main character and the one we are rooting for to succeed.

Jesse: The female hero.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: A lot of the shows and movies we have been watching have been from the Marvel Universe. So, for listeners who may be unfamiliar with this, Marvel is a comic book company they are the company who has created The Avengers, The X-Men...what else?

Andrew: Characters like Captain America, and Ironman, and Hulk, and Thor, and Spiderman.

Jesse: Right. And then, we've also been watching a few other individual shows outside of that particular company. So, one show that comes to mind is Game of Thrones, a very popular show. And, you've also been watching Orphan Black.

Andrew: That's right.

Jesse: And, if I'm not mistaken, the main character in that show is a female.

Andrews: Main characters, in fact.

Jesse: Main characters. One of the things I mentioned to you was my disappointment in how the female characters were portrayed in the recent Avengers movies.

Andrew: Okay, yes.

Jesse: Now, you also shared some similar disappointments with a couple of the characters, mainly the Black Widow, if I'm not mistaken.

Andrew: Correct. This is Scarlet Johansen playing the one female hero in The Avengers movies next to many other male characters. And, to be clear, you and I agree on a basic point, that is: We think there should be more strong female characters in many of these stories, and the conversation we're having is about what that looks like and what types of representations, what types of characters are best suited for these roles.

Jesse: Now, before we continue this conversation, let me just acknowledge the fact that you and I are two males in our early to mid-thirties...

Andrew: [chuckling] Right.

Jesse: ...Talking about what we think a strong female character looks like in a show.

Andrew: [laughing] Right. So you can just shut off the podcast now and stop listening, because we have no right to be having this conversation at all, but we're going to do it anyway...

Jesse: [laughing] For those who are still interested in practicing their English listening comprehension skill, please continue to listen on.

Andrew: [chuckling] Maybe the rage and insult that you feel from hearing us talk about this will motivate you to practice your English so you can tell us how we're wrong.

Jesse: Exactly! Yes. Good point! For the listening audience, if you have an opinion about this matter after listening to this, please share your opinion with us on the LPLE Facebook page. Know that we would love to hear your opinion about this.

If there's one thing that you and I agree on, as you just said, we would love to see more strong female characters represented on TV, in general.

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: For the Black Widow character in the Avengers, if I remember correctly you weren't a fan of how she was portrayed.

Andrew: I like the character in the movies, but I don't like the way that she is underused in the main story lines of the movies. So, she is always present when the Avengers go and do something, but she is usually on the sidelines while someone like Captain America or Iron Man is doing all of the talking, and making a lot of the decisions, and fighting in most of the most complicated battles against enemies, and I wish that she had a more central role to play in the storylines.

Jesse: So, my opinion on the matter is I feel like she does have a central role to play in those movies; I'm not a fan of her delivery, of her acting. So, when you mentioned that she should have her own movie, I agree with you that the Black Widow should have her own movie, I'm just not a fan of that particular actress playing that character. So, let's take a look at Game of Thrones; I mentioned Game of Thrones. At our recent group dinner on Monday I came to you excited because I felt like I found a good comparison.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: The women on the show Game of Thrones, they don't have too much screen time; although, in this season I think they're having much more. For the limited amount of screen time that they have, I'm a big fan of both their plot position in the show because it's very prominent--I appreciate just how strong they are as a particular-... as that figure in that show, but more importantly I'm a big fan of their acting.

Andrew: Right. And, I don't disagree. I think that the Game of Thrones characters are growing and developing very well, and they are being shown very well in the show; and, I agree, also, that the acting being done in most of those cases is very, very good. So, we agree on all of those points.

I think that if there is a disagreement, it is about whether or not that is the only way to present a strong female character or not. And, I think where you and I disagree on Black Widow--part of it may be a preference for the actress, which is just personal between you and me, and the other part might have a little bit to do with the character that she is playing and whether that character is bold, and loud, and in-your-face, or more of a subdued personality as a character that might be making her performance less interesting to watch.

Jesse: The Black Widow's character, by nature, is supposed to be somewhat subdued, right?

Andrew: Yes. She usually tries to stay out of conflicts until absolutely necessary. And, while she has her own opinions, she is not as invested necessarily in the outcomes of some of the disputes that happened in the movies that she's in. And, I think that, to my mind, contributes to why she is less forceful, and less forward, and less commanding like many of the Game of Thrones characters are.

Jesse: Do you think that if she had her own movie that that would change? I think by nature, because she is a spy, she can't really engage too much. I mean, it would sound like she would be the female version of Jason Bourne in The Bourne Identity, to some extent, right?

Andrew: Right. I agree, and what I think would be different about a Black Widow movie that is standing alone is that instead of being a character in other people's stories--like she is in Captain America movies or Avengers movies--she would have a chance to be the main character in her own story, and she might have a much stronger opinion and an opportunity to be much more forceful in those stores.

Jesse: Well, to that extent, I really do hope that Marvel gives some consideration, like you suggested, to creating a Black Widow movie. I like Scarlett Johansson, I think, in general, she's a fantastic actress. I feel as though her role in this movie is challenged given the nature of her character. But, nevertheless, it does warrant some consideration for an individual spinoff Black Widow movie.

Andrew: I have heard rumors that they are planning to make one, and I can't wait to see it.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

May 31, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse does a solo reading of Seattle local news. Follow the below link to read the full story, as well as learn new words and vocabulary, and improve your pronunciation and listening comprehension.

Seattle Weekly
Leaders of Washington's Economy: Anti-LGBT Discrimination Is Bad for Business
Published May 6 2016 at 12:43PM
By Daniel Person

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Website: dialog.fm/LPLE
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/lple/id1098735563
Facebook: facebook.com/LPLEDialogFM
Twitter: twitter.com/LPLEDialogFM
Patreon: patreon.com/LPLE

May 24, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse does a solo reading of Seattle local news. Follow the below link to read the full story, as well as learn new words and vocabulary, and improve your pronunciation and listening comprehension.

The Seattle Times
Wal-Mart sharpens Amazon attack with 2-day delivery service
Originally published May 12, 2016 at 6:49 am
Updated May 12, 2016 at 3:29 pm
By Anne D'Innocenzio
The Associated Press

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

Website: dialog.fm/LPLE
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/lple/id1098735563
Facebook: facebook.com/LPLEDialogFM
Twitter: twitter.com/LPLEDialogFM
Patreon: patreon.com/LPLE

May 17, 2016

Welcome to LPLE, "Let's Practice Listening in English!"

Jesse and Andrew talk about online dating, older methods of meeting people, and the loss of the ability to introduce one's self to a stranger.

Join in the conversation! Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to ask us questions about English conversation and meet other English language learners all over the world.

 

Website: dialog.fm/LPLE
iTunes: itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/lple/id1098735563
Facebook: facebook.com/LPLEDialogFM
Twitter: twitter.com/LPLEDialogFM
Patreon: patreon.com/LPLE

TRANSCRIPT

Intro [Jesse]: Hi everyone. My name is Jesse Robbins, and welcome to LPLE from Dialogue FM. We're the podcast that lets you practice listening in English. We speak English slowly and clearly so that you can follow along and understand native English speakers more easily. I'm excited to help you improve your English listening skills, as well as help you learn new vocabulary, grammar, and idioms commonly heard and conversation among native English speakers. If you want to practice listening in English, then we invite you to join our conversation.

Jesse: Hey, Andrew.

Andrew: Hey, Jesse.

Jesse: Let me just say that dating in our society--modern-day dating--confuses the hell out of me.

Andrew: I am right there with you.

Jesse: We are both in our early thirties...

Andrew: Yes.

Jesse: ...and when we look back on our twenties--common dating age--dating was a lot different than what dating looks like now.

Andrew: Yes. I think the dating culture that you and I grew up with was a much more traditional form of dating--that's the type that is probably closer to the kind of dating that maybe even our parents did when they were younger--and technology and social networking and the internet have kind of broken all of the rules that you and I used to follow...

Jesse: ...and have created their own rules.

Andrew: Yes. New standards and also ways of interacting and ways of meeting people that you and I didn't even have when we started going out to meet romantic partners.

Jesse: Now, of course, there are pros and cons, there are the benefits and drawbacks, to this new form of dating, and you can say there's benefits and drawbacks, pros and cons, to the old way of dating back in our twenties.

Andrew: Right!

Jesse: I feel confident enough to say that if I were a single man now, I just could not handle the modern-day dating scene, which is-... I'm mean, what are the common apps that people use nowadays?

Andrew: I think that nowadays rather than going to the bar and trying to meet someone you've never seen before, or being introduced through a friend, or asking someone out who you knew in a different context, either at work or to school, is not the most common way anymore because we have matchmaking websites like OkCupid or Match.com in the United States, or I think the most popular in our city is Tinder, which is the mobile app on our phone that lets us meet people without a whole lot of introduction and without a whole lot of detail about who the person is. It is like Facebook reduced to a picture and two sentences, and people make decisions on the spot about whether or not they are interested in meeting the other person. And, my understanding--I've never used this; I feel like a very old man just because I'm no longer in the market for this service--but, my understanding is you look at a bunch of pictures, see the person's first name, and read two sentences about them, and you say "yes, I'd like to meet this person," or "no, I wouldn't," and that is enough to carry on the conversation to the next level, because once both people say "yes" then they're allowed to contact each other and make plans for a date, which is about like walking into a coffee shop, and making an order, finding out the person behind you made the same order, and then going on a date next, which seems kind of crazy fast to me and without a whole lot of planning or preparation.

Jesse: The screen on your phone, even with a [iPhone] 6 Plus, is not that large to contain a lot of information about someone, and then make a determination of whether or not you want to spend the next hour, or two hours, or five hours of your life with them.

Andrew: Hahaha...

Jesse: That's really what you're doing. You're trying to create-... Have the best looking photo of yourself and combine the best mix of words such that you will attract somebody.

Andrew: Right. I think we are coming off sounding a bit old and out of fashion with this...

Jesse: Yeah, out of touch.

Andrew: ...out of touch, really, because we are used to meeting people earlier in the process and kind of evaluating from afar or being introduced, and things move a bit more slowly, and you are considering a person rather than an idea, and I think that's just us not being ready for this technology more than anything else, because I think you and I, because we have partners, don't need to be out finding new people all the time. And, what this technology lets you do is skip the part where you have to bravely introduce yourself to someone you don't know in the bar, or beg all your friends for introductions, or hope you are lucky enough to meet someone at a sports team, or a job, or a school that meets your interests.

There's a lot of research that we had to do--I guess, in general--that people can skip and go to meeting people right away, and that seems to be what everyone wants in the first place. So, I think it's actually probably a good thing.

Jesse: In the end, it's definitely made the process a lot easier for people. The barrier to talking to new people is dramatically reduced.

Andrew: Right.

Jesse: But, therein also lies a problem: We've lost the ability to talk to other people, right? If you think about, we've somewhat lost the ability to effectively introduce ourselves to a complete stranger and strike up a normal conversation.

Andrew: Do you think that people had to practice being social and charming in person because they were forced to because of all of the dating that needed to happen before you got to know someone in the past, and that now people don't need to practice, and so they aren't as good at it?

Jesse: I think there's an element of training that goes on--trial by fire, learning through experience. When I look back, before I met my current wife, when I was in the dating scene, when I was engaged in dating and introducing myself to women, yeah, there was an element of learning how to introduce myself appropriately, there were some successes and there were plenty of failures. Overall, I felt like it was a good skill to learn, primarily because you eventually learn how to get over that fear of introducing yourself to a stranger, and I think that skill carries over into a lot of other things. You can carry that skill over into your professional life, which is just learning how to go into a new room and introduce yourself to new people. I think that there's-... As nice as it is to streamline, to make it easier to meet people for the purpose of a potentially romantic relationship, I do believe that there's an element of social interaction that is lost, a particular skill that is lost.

Andrew: And, I think I agree with you in terms of the software not being able to add that social interaction. What I think is happening is that people get to know more about the person before they have to expend the energy, so people who are naturally social, naturally friendly can go out there and meet people the old fashion way. But, they also have this tool to meet more people sooner, which lets them practice sooner with more people, if that is their stumbling block. So, I think, on balance, it is probably better, it is-... We have the old ways and we have the new ways, and people have more options, in general, when they're going out to find their next date.

Jesse: Much like I would assume everybody in the dating scene agrees: The more options, the better.

Andrew: Agreed.

Outro [Jesse]: Thank you for listening to this episode of LPLE, Let's Practice Listening in English, from Dialog.FM. Subscribe to LPLE on iTunes to hear the latest episodes, or listen to past episodes on our website, Dialog.FM. That's d-i-a-l-o-g-dot-f-m. If you have questions or comments about English, or if you would like for us to use a word, grammar, or idiom in our conversation so you can learn how to use it correctly, we would love to hear from you on Twitter at @dialogdotfm or Facebook at facebook.com/dialogFM.

1 2 Next »